a-few-words-on-web-dev

Dev stuff will happen one of these nights soon. There is literally nothing stopping me from jumping right in, and getting stuff done with the **Thanx** project, and I *want* to “Get Shit Done” (to use a toxic motto), and have the (very satisfying) sense of accomplishment, but sometimes laziness tends to win out with me :/ Also, I have felt less inspired these days, mostly because *when* the **Thanx** project is complete (or at least v.1.0), I know that I will then be turning the project into an open source project, which is good, but it could mean a lot of stuff to keep up with/maintain (which of course it would, why wouldn’t it?). nnAnd also, I sincerely doubt I will do that gimmicky Product Hunt, Indie Hackers, “omg look at the next big thing” route with this software. That may be OK for the super-hyped, web3, Bitcoin, Musk-worshippers – but for a guy like me (who simply wants to make a cool thing), I’m much more akin to just releasing the stuff onto Github (and wherever else, letting different people know about it), and having the thing said and done, and NOT making a big show about it.nnThat’s the thing about programming/coding/web development/etc: everyone *thinks* you have to be the next rag-tag, indie, bootstrapped competitor in whatever space (or market) that that product fits into, and it simply doesn’t have to be that way, at all. To be a “big business”, then yes, obviously the co would *have* to go that route – but, if you (or **I**) make things just to make them and see what comes of what, through whatever channels I choose to expose the product to, then that is certainly a more *humble* way of product testing, building the best thing you can make, and having something one can be proud of.nn#dev

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